Thursday, September 4, 2014

Short And Oh So Dark: The Dark World & Dark Metropolis

The Dark World (Dark World, #1)Author: Cara Lynn Shultz
Series: The Dark World, #1
Published: May 27th 2014
Publisher: Harlequin Teen
Lenght: 384 pages
Source: Publisher for review
Buy: Amazon

Paige Kelly is used to weird--in fact, she probably corners the market on weird, considering that her best friend, Dottie, has been dead since the 1950s. But when a fire demon attacks Paige in detention, she has to admit that things have gotten out of her league. Luckily, the cute new boy in school, Logan Bradley, is a practiced demon slayer-and he isn't fazed by Paige's propensity to chat with the dead. Suddenly, Paige is smack in the middle of a centuries-old battle between warlocks and demons, learning to fight with a magic sword so that she can defend herself. And if she makes one wrong move, she'll be pulled into the Dark World, an alternate version of our world that's overrun by demons-and she might never make it home.

There’s an important lesson to be learned here about the opening chapters of a book. It took me ten days to fight my way through the first two or three chapters of The Dark World, only to end up glued to the pages once things started picking up. It’s a good thing I’m stubborn; in the end, this was a surprisingly entertaining (albeit not particularly memorable) story.

It starts out as your typical YA paranormal romance, but ends up being so much more interesting. Paige Kelly is the weird girl at school, a social outcast considered crazy by her peers and her parents, all due to her ability to speak with the departed. Her best and only friend is a ghost from the 1950s until the new boy starts paying attention to her. In many ways, Logan is your typical YA PNR boy, but he does stand out in that he’s much kinder and softer from the start. I loved the progression of romance in this book and I have high hopes for the sequel.

The worldbuilding was also done refreshingly well. The Dark World is actually a different dimension, ruled by demons and their Queen. Most of this story takes place in our world, but the Dark World is a constant threat, a creepy background our heroes fight against.

In conclusion, The Dark World is a promising start to a new series. I can’t wait to read more!

A copy of this book was kindly provided by the publisher for review purposes. No considerations, monetary or otherwise, have influenced the opinions expressed in this review.

Dark Metropolis (Dark Metropolis, #1)Author: Jaclyn Dolamore
Series: Dark Metropolis, #1
Released: June 17th 2014
Publisher: Disney-Hyperion
Lenght: 304 pages
Source: Publisher for review
Buy: Amazon

Cabaret meets Cassandra Clare-a haunting magical thriller set in a riveting 1930s-esque world.
Sixteen-year-old Thea Holder's mother is cursed with a spell that's driving her mad, and whenever they touch, Thea is chilled by the magic, too. With no one else to contribute, Thea must make a living for both of them in a sinister city, where danger lurks and greed rules.
Thea spends her nights waitressing at the decadent Telephone Club attending to the glitzy clientele. But when her best friend, Nan, vanishes, Thea is compelled to find her. She meets Freddy, a young, magnetic patron at the club, and he agrees to help her uncover the city's secrets-even while he hides secrets of his own.
Together, they find a whole new side of the city. Unrest is brewing behind closed doors as whispers of a gruesome magic spread. And if they're not careful, the heartless masterminds behind the growing disappearances will be after them, too.
Perfect for fans of Cassandra Clare, this is a chilling thriller with a touch of magic where the dead don't always seem to stay that way.

For a series opener, Dark Metropolis had plenty of potential, but unfortunately, a lot of it was left unfulfilled. While there were certainly advantages to this story (its very unique take on zombies just one of the many examples), the final result is unfocused and just a tiny bit immature.

The world, for one, was neither clear nor developed as it should have been. The story has a distinct historical feel, but we’re given neither the time nor the place, which leaves us feeling untethered and lost. It’s a grim post-war world with very limited resources and very high demands and the government is determined to keep things up to their usual standard, regardless of the cost.

We meet three pretty equal protagonists – Thea, Nan and Freddy. Quite frankly, Nan was the only one who seemed to know what she was doing. She approached all her problems with determination and strength, while Thea and Freddy blundered about, coming up with ridiculously childish plans and generally making a mess of things.

I believe Dark Metropolis might be better suited for a younger audience. I myself found this story entertaining, but it lacked in both structure and emotional depth, and at least some of it can be blamed on the characters. If it looks good, perhaps read a sample first just to make sure that this type of story works for you.

A copy of this book was kindly provided by the publisher for review purposes. No considerations, monetary or otherwise, have influenced the opinions expressed in this review.


  1. I think the second one I will pass on. I have read very similar reviews on it from others and I just think it is one I don't want to struggle though.
    Dark World does sound intriguing though and I am glad you stuck with it and ended up really liking it, I love it when that happens!

  2. Aw it's too bad that Dark Metropolis failed to impress, that synopsis was pretty great. World building is really important for a fantasy and when it's not done well, it's hard to enjoy.

    Also, wow 10 days is a long time. 2 days is my max if it's not a review book.


  3. Great reviews! I was on the fence about both books, but now I'm definitely going to get Darkworld. It sounds like a really intriguing story, and now I won't be deterred by the slow pacing of the first few chapters. Thanks!

  4. I agree with you on Dark Metropolis Maja! I was entertained as well, but was definitely hoping for more emotional depth. Like you said, it might work better for a younger audience who might not care quite as much about the world-building or a strong emotional connection the characters.

    Glad the Dark World was more successful for you!

  5. I'll have to check out the Dark World. I know it got some meh reviews but you have me curious. I completely agree with you on Dark Metropolis, which had so much potential but hardly any world building and the characters didn't click with me. I mostly skimmed that one.

  6. Paige as the outcast and a little strange is the kind of character that I relate to

  7. I just can't get excited about either one of these books. The reviews were mixed for both adn I am feeling so burned out on YA right now. I think I will pas

  8. First one yes, second one maybe ;)

  9. As for the first one it's nice to see that you had a good time with the book even if it was difficult at first. As for the second one, I heard mixed things about it, it's sad because I love the cover... Thanks for the reviews!

  10. I agree with you about Dark Metropolis. Why are so many YAs actually reading younger lately? I'm kind of intrigued by the first that starts out typical and impressed you at the end!

  11. The first thing that stood out for me were the two covers of these books, they were absolutely stunning! I have to agree that sometimes I do find first few chapters of books boring and dull but once you perverse through they become quite good. I am glad you stuck it out and enjoyed The Dark World. Fabulous reviews!


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